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    Wild Blog — drinks

    The Best Recipes for Probiotic Smoothies

    The Best Recipes for Probiotic Smoothies

    It's not always easy getting your daily dose of probiotics without having the same old thing over and over again. Or if you prefer supplements such as capsules or pills, you might get tired of taking them every day. So, why not mix it up?

    Yogurt is the number one food source used for obtaining that daily dose of probiotics. But instead of just eating plan ole yogurt or even jazzing it up with granola and fruit, try something different with it. Why not try a smoothie!

    What are Probiotics?

    Probiotics are live bacteria and yeasts that our body needs to keep it properly functioning. Your body is made up of both good and bad bacteria. Probiotics are considered "good" bacteria due to their properties that help keep your gut healthy, your digestive system regulated, and to fight off bad bacteria. When you have a build-up of bad bacteria, your body will feel sluggish and even ill. Probiotics help to restore balance making you feel better.

    Benefits of Probiotics

    There are numerous health benefits relating to probiotics. The good bacteria not only keeps you healthy by supporting your immune system but also helps control inflammation. Good bacteria have also been known to help your body digest food, keep bad bacteria in-check, create vitamins that your body needs, support the cells that line your gut preventing bad bacteria from entering your blood and keeping your gut healthy, and to breakdown and absorb medications easier.

    To learn more about probiotics and all the benefits it has to offer, check out Wild Foods' article, The Benefit of Probiotics for Your Gut Health.

    Wild Foods BEST Probiotic Smoothie Recipe

    Everywhere on social media, it seems to be the start of fall, meanwhile, here in Texas, it is still 100 degrees outside! We wanted to welcome fall with open arms (hoping it is right around the corner), but still, find a way to cool down from the hot temperatures surrounding us.

    When we think of fall here at Wild Foods, we think of two things: pumpkin (of course!) and vanilla. When we think of summer, we think of that one thing that you can only get during summer: peaches! So naturally, we combined vanilla and peaches together to get our Vanilla Peach Smoothie.

    Vanilla Peach Smoothie

    • 1 cup vanilla or plain Greek yogurt
    • 1/2 banana
    • 1-2 peaches (cut into chunks)
    • 1/2 teaspoon Wild Vanilla Powder
    • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
    • 1 cup coconut water (no added sugars, 100% coconut water)
    • Handful of ice

    Blend all ingredients until nice and smooth.

    Serve and enjoy!

    Other Probiotic Smoothie Recipes

    Berry-Greek Smoothie

    • 1 cup vanilla or plain Greek yogurt
    • 1 cup coconut water (no added sugars, 100% coconut water) OR milk
    • 1 1/2 cup strawberries (cut into chunks or diced)
    • 1 1/2 cup blueberries
    • Handful of ice

    Blend all ingredients until nice and smooth.

    Serve and enjoy!

    Tropical Greens Smoothie

    • 1 cup vanilla or plain Greek yogurt
    • 2 cups pineapple (cut into chunks)
    • 1/2 teaspoon Wild Turmeric Powder
    • 1/2 teaspoon Wild Vanilla Powder
    • 1 cup spinach
    • 1 cup coconut water (no added sugars, 100% coconut water)
    • 1/4 cup coconut (shredded)
    • Handful of ice

    Blend all ingredients until nice and smooth.

    Serve and enjoy!

    Sweet Mango Smoothie

    • 1 cup vanilla or plain Greek yogurt
    • 1 cup coconut water (no added sugars, 100% coconut water)
    • 3/4 cup mango (cut into chunks)
    • 1/2 cup strawberries
    • Spoonful of honey OR packet of sweetener
    • Handful of ice

    Blend all ingredients until nice and smooth.

    Serve and enjoy!

    Making a probiotic smoothie is super easy! All you need is one extra ingredient: Greek yogurt. Add this to any smoothie and you have yourself a probiotic smoothie!

    Commonly Asked Questions

    What are the best smoothie ingredients?

    The most obvious healthy ingredients to put into your smoothies are the common sense items like fresh fruit. Bananas, apples, oranges, berries, cherries, mangoes, pineapple and kiwi are all popular choices.

    What are probiotics, and what do they do?

    Probiotics are live organisms that populate your gut with healthy bacteria. They are well-known for the ability to improve digestive health and immunity, and their support for weight loss, among many other things.

    What you must know about probiotics and prebiotics?

    Prebiotics are used with the intention of improving the balance of these microorganisms. Probiotics are in foods such as yogurt and sauerkraut. Prebiotics are in foods such as whole grains, bananas, greens, onions, garlic, soybeans and artichokes. In addition, probiotics and prebiotics are added to some foods and available as dietary supplements. Research is ongoing into the relationship of the gut microflora to disease.

    What foods are high in probiotics?

    There's many foods rich in probiotics. the best probiotic-rich foods include kefir, traditional yogurt, tempeh, miso, kombucha, natto, buttermilk, sauerkraut, dark chocolate, and green olives, among others.

    Further Reading

    https://smoothiegains.com/the-best-probiotic-smoothie-recipes/

    https://helloglow.co/probiotic-and-prebiotic-smoothies/

    How to Make Healthy Superfood Smoothies that Taste Great

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    Have you joined the smoothie hype yet? If not, we think it’s time. There’s really nothing like good superfood smoothies that entice the taste buds and supercharge energy levels simultaneously.

    Or perhaps you make smoothies, but haven’t quite cracked the code to creating something both healthy and worthy of your cravings.

    Regardless, follow these quick smoothie-making tips, and you’ll be chowing down on ice cream-like superfood goodness in no time.

    Superfood Smoothies Taste (And Feel) Best with Both Fruits and Vegetables

    We’ve seen two categories of smoothie makers: the ones who pile in only fruits (which isn’t necessarily a bad thing sometimes) for the sweetest taste, and the ones who are going for the gold with plenty of veg, but are then left with a not-so-tasty looking swamp water that looks somewhat like salsa.

    We believe in the healing power of both fruit and veg, thus we advocate for using both when possible in smoothies. So what might this look like? Perhaps the best way is to show you with a recipe. Check it out:

    Fruit and Vegetable Smoothie Recipe

    • 1 banana fresh or frozen
    • 1 cup frozen blueberries
    • ½ avocado
    • 1 medium leaf of chard
    • 3 slices of raw zucchini

    The first thing you may notice about this healthy smoothie recipe is that it tastes nice despite the presence of chard and zucchini. The banana, blueberries, and avocado do a nice job of masking the taste of the vegetables. Also, the avocado, despite its technical classification as a fruit, serves a similar nutritional profile as a vegetable in that it doesn’t have too much sugar and offers an impressive nutrient profile.

    Sneak in the Superfoods

    Adding superfoods to your smoothies won’t make them unappetizing. Reason being, strange flavors will easily be masked by the rest of the smoothie ingredients. There are even a few examples of superfoods that make smoothies taste better.

    Here are the powders and things we suggest adding to optimize your smoothies!

    • Cocoa powder is an example of a superfood that will make your healthy smoothies taste amazing. It’s also chalked full of magnesium, iron, and other nutrients particularly beneficial to the brain. Our Wild Cocoa Powder is a single-origin powder from small farmers in Peru. Try it out!
    • Medicinal mushroom powders such as chaga mushroom powder have tastes that are easily masked by other ingredients within smoothies. Chaga mushroom, often referred to as the “king” of medicinal mushrooms, contains many impressive benefits for immunity and reducing inflammation.
    • Bee pollen, like cacao, is a tasty addition to smoothies. We recommend topping your smoothie with the pollen as well as some cacao nibs and coconut flakes for awesome taste and texture! Bee pollen, according to research, is absolutely jam-packed full of nutrients including vitamins, minerals, amino acids, and other beneficial compounds. Bee pollen has been shown to be anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, and even contains wound healing properties.
    • A good superfood powder such as our Wild Reds Powder blends nicely into smoothies, especially smoothies that contain plenty of berries and cacao. This particular Reds powder is great to consume prior to physical activity. It increases nitric oxide production in the body, thus aiding in blood flow, energy levels, and recovery. For an extra boost, the powder also contains kale, spinach, acai, spirulina, and pomegranate.

    Focus on Texture

    Did you know that chewing is an extremely essential part of the digestion process? The salivation you experience at the sight or smell of a good meal is nature’s way of releasing digestive enzymes. That’s right, your saliva contains enzymes that begin breaking down your food before being swallowed. So properly chewing your food can really do your stomach and the rest of your digestive system a solid.

    This is why we’re suggesting you blend healthy smoothies thick and spoon them out of a bowl. Truth is, smoothies are not DRINKS, they are FOOD. So don’t use a straw, use a spoon.

    Lucky for you, a thick texture means ice cream-like goodness that doesn’t seem like it should be healthy (trust us, it is).

    A recipe like the one we offered above should taste pretty good when blended thick (use the smallest amount of liquid possible). Enjoy!

    How to Make Lion's Mane Mushroom Tea

    How to Make Lion's Mane Mushroom Tea

    Lion’s mane mushroom tea is quickly becoming a favored beverage among health and biohacking enthusiasts seeking to boost their brain health.

    Perhaps most popularized by famous mycologist Paul Stamets, this medicinal mushroom has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for thousands of years. Today, it’s being studied to prevent and relieve dementia, boost immunity, and to improve general cognition.

    How to Make Lion’s Mane Mushroom Tea  

    First, you’ll need to obtain a high quality lion’s mane mushroom powder, such as our Shroom #4 Lion's Mane Mushroom Extract. There are a few things that make our lion’s mane stand out in terms of quality.

    First, while sourcing mushrooms in China may seem suspicious, we source ours from trusted suppliers who grow and process their mushrooms in high-altitude mountainous regions far from the contaminants of congested cities. The growing process excludes grains, mycelium and starch. We source log-grown fruiting bodies only.

    To extract the beneficial beta glucans and other beneficial components of lion’s mane mushroom, we use our signature hot water triple-extraction process.

    Through working with small farmers who’ve participated in generations of sustainable growing practices, we ensure only the best of the best lion’s mane.

    Once you’ve obtained high quality lion’s mane, follow these steps to make a delicious tea.

    Lion’s Mane Milk Tea Latte

    Lion’s mane doesn’t taste bad. Actually, many report it tastes something like cocoa powder. Regardless, beginners to the world of mushrooms may wish to start with a tea that emphasizes taste and masks the earthy tones of lion’s mane.

    Making lion’s mane mushroom tea with milk is a good choice for a tasty morning or evening beverage. Experiment with ratios and adding in other ingredients to further boost the benefits of your routine drink.

    1. Heat your plant milk of choice in a pot over the stove.
    2. Place the hot milk in a blender. Add a serving (approximately half a tsp) of lion’s mane powder into the blender.
    3. Add a low-glycemic sweetener such as stevia, xylitol, raw honey, or coconut sugar to the blender.
    4. Add any other ingredients to boost the benefits of your tea (think our Wild Cocotropic or a serving of Wild Cocoa Butter for a creamier consistency)
    5. Blend for 7 seconds. Pour into a mug.
    6. Enjoy with a sprinkle of cinnamon on top.

    Simple Lion’s Mane Mushroom Tea

    Here’s a simple take on a lion’s mane mushroom tea. It only requires lion’s mane powder and hot water.

    1. Boil hot water in a kettle or pot over the stove.
    2. Let the boiling water stand/cool off for 30 seconds.
    3. Place hot water (off the boil) and a serving of lion’s mane in a cup.
    4. Stir thoroughly.

    That’s it. Simplicity. If you want an easier stirring process, feel free to use a blender or our blender bottle. Also note that a bit of lemon pairs nicely with this tea.

    Lion’s Mane Tea with Golden Milk

    Golden Milk is an Ayurvedic treasure with hosts of benefits. In this recipe, we use our Wild Golden Milk Powder fused with lion’s mane for a true superfood tea.

    1. Heat plant milk or water over the stove.
    2. Add the water/milk, a serving of golden milk powder, and a serving of lion’s mane to a blender cup.
    3. Blend for 7 seconds.
    4. Pour and add a sprinkle of cinnamon to the top if desired.

    Check out some more ways to use lion's mane in drinks.

    The Benefits of Drinking Adaptogenic Mushrooms

    Mushrooms such as reishi, chaga, turkey tail, and yes, lion’s mane are frequently purchased for their immune-enhancing properties. Though more research is still required, researchers are going as far as admitting that such mushrooms can even help treat cancer. Check out our article on Turkey Tail benefits.

    Lion’s mane can help with the immune system, but is usually sought out to boost cognition. More specifically, here are the top benefits of lion’s mane.

    Immune Health

    Research into the immunoenhancing properties of lion’s mane is underway, and the results are looking promising. The polysaccharides within lion’s mane hold a particular power at inducing T cell production. Increases in macrophages, a type of mobile white blood cell, are also noted.

    Cognitive Impairment

    Lion’s mane seems to heal the brain.

    In a study examining Japanese men and women diagnosed with cognitive impairment, researchers found that the subjects taking lion’s mane “showed significantly increased scores on the cognitive function scale compared with the placebo group.”

    The study is a fairly recent, double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial wherein the lion’s mane group (as opposed to placebo) took “four 250 mg tablets containing 96% of Yamabushitake dry powder three times a day for 16 weeks.”

    Studies like this explain why lion’s mane could be promising for not only mild cognitive impairment, but Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia as well.

    Neurotrophic Properties

    Tying into our last point, research shows that lion’s mane can promote the growth of neurons. The linked study reveals that lion’s mane from Malaysia “contained neuroactive compounds which induced NGF-synthesis and promoted neurite outgrowth.”

    NGF stands for nerve growth factor. NGF is a neuropeptide involved in the growth and maintenance of new neurons. Since its discovery and isolation in 1956, it’s been found to improve brain health as well as improve immunity.

    Final Words on Lion’s Mane Mushroom Tea Benefits

    Mushroom tea benefits range from improving immunity and enhancing thinking.

    For the best results, consumers should try to use lion’s mane mushroom on a daily basis. As in the research provided, participants were active, consistent consumers. This is how they got the beneficial results noted.

    Although we examined how to use lion’s mane mushroom in tea form, it can also be used in capsules, in smoothies and other drinks like coffee, and even sprinkled over food.

    What's The Difference Between Adaptogens and Nootropics?

    On our long, arduous journeys toward health, we inevitably come across important terms worth examining. Adaptogens and nootropics are two examples of similar yet different words we need to define.

    Adaptogens and nootropics encompass foods, herbs, and compounds that benefit the body and mind in specific ways. Adaptogens and nootropics, however, are distinct in their benefits. 

    That's why, in this article, we're going to define "adaptogen" and "nootropic," discuss the differences between them, and then give examples of each that you can use daily.

    Defining Adaptogens

    The most basic definition of adaptogens is a type of plant that helps your body cope with stress. They minimize your stress levels by regulating cortisol, which can also mitigate the effects of restlessness and fatigue. 

    Adaptogens are herbs and plants that interact with your endocrine and nervous systems by adjusting levels of hormones and neurotransmitters. They can adapt to changes in your body at a specific moment, allowing it to remain in homeostasis. 

    Adaptogens research has found that they can improve mental performance. Reducing your body's reaction to stress can allow you to achieve peak concentration. Similarly, adaptogens can diminish the negative effect of extreme temperatures, harsh weather, or loud noises on your physical performance. 

    The main benefit of adaptogens is their ability to increase your body's resistance to stress over time!

    Some examples of adaptogens include ashwagandha, Rhodiola, curcumin, and reishi mushrooms. Although the term adaptogen may be relatively new, these plants and herbs have been used for centuries in traditional styles of medicine. 

    Individuals that face high-stress situations regularly, like athletes, students taking exams, or manual laborers, can supplement with adaptogens to improve performance and reduce the effect of their stressful environments. 

    How are Nootropics Different?

    Nootropics can enhance cognitive function, but they are a bit different. Many of the same herbs that are considered adaptogens are also nootropics. As a result, nootropics can almost serve as an umbrella term since most adaptogens can be categorized as such. 

    The key is that where adaptogens specifically focus on reducing the effects of stress, nootropics include all plants and herbs that can improve cognition and brain health. The mushrooms in this category can help you feel motivated and focused, boost memory and concentration, and enhance your creativity. 

    While you might not necessarily be familiar with the term, you likely use these brain boosters daily. 

    For example, the caffeine found in your morning Cup of coffee is a nootropic that can improve physical and mental performance. Here are some other examples: 

    • Creatine: boost the energy supply to your brain cells 
    • Siberian Ginseng: reduces adrenal fatigue and improves learning capacity 
    • Rhodiola Rosea: enhances your attention span and mental processing capabilities 
    • Choline: a nutrient that optimizes brain function

    In other words, nootropics are natural, safe substances that can help you improve several aspects of brain function, like memory and learning. 

    Examples of Adaptogens

    Shilajit

    A favorite among ayurvedic practitioners, shilajit is a mineral-dense resin found in the mountainous regions of the East, particularly in the Himalayas. It has been used medicinally for thousands of years.

    Though shilajit has pro-cognitive effects, we've added it to our adaptogens list. Shilajit, according to Ayurveda, increases the body's resistance to stress by supporting various tissues in the body and vital organ function with its high mineral content.

    After all, shilajit is Sanskrit for "destroyer of weakness" and has been shown to prevent several diseases. It's an excellent go-to supplement to keep in your cabinet. 

    Reishi Mushroom

    There's a good reason our Reishi Mushroom Extract is in high demand.

    Reishi contains antioxidants and synergistic constituents that may protect against sleep disorders, fatigue, chronic infections, poor detoxification, and inflammation—several issues intricately tied to stress.

    Reishi is considered adaptogenic because it's powerful in its ability to combat stress directly. In one small study, for example, athletes successfully used reishi to combat unwanted, exercised-induced stress on the body.

    Ashwagandha

    You may have heard of all adaptogenic herbs, ashwagandha is perhaps the most commonly referred to. It is another herb used in Ayurvedic medicine, roughly translates to "the smell and strength of the horse."

    In terms of its adaptogenic properties, ashwagandha promotes a healthy release of cortisol and inflammatory response in the face of stress (stressful situations, exercise-induced stress/inflammation, etc.). It's also been shown to be beneficial for physical endurance and performance in young adults

    Though studied for other benefits such as increasing libido and bolstering physical endurance, ashwagandha is one to look out for when seeking relaxation and a healthier response to teeth-gritting situations.

    Popular nootropics

    Nootropics are foods and supplements that benefit brain health and cognition. They can decrease the risk of dementia, enhance memory, improve neurogenesis, and even boost reactivity. Recent advances in neurology and health science have correlated with a surge in demand for foods and supplements that are healthy for the brain.

    Nootropics are for anyone. They're for the elderly who want to keep that extra edge in their old age while preventing neurodegenerative disease. They're for students who study hard in school and are in various academic clubs and circles. They're for the athlete who wants more energy and focus.

    Here are a few popular nootropics currently in wide circulation among health enthusiasts. 

    Lion's Mane Mushroom 

    Lion's mane is a powerful medicinal mushroom that works as a nootropic by enhancing neurogenesis (the production of new brain cells), neuroprotection, and nerve growth factor (NGF). NGF is a protein that promotes learning and memory in the brain.

    Lion's mane is being studied not only for learning and memory but also for healing the brain. In recent dementia research, lion's hair has been found beneficial for preventing and perhaps even reversing neurodegenerative disease.

    There's considerable speculation about whether people should supplement lion's mane via either the mycelium (root system) or the fruiting body (actual mushroom). Just in case, we source high-quality fruiting body extracts for our lion's mane powder.

    Ginkgo Biloba

    This is a popular herb used for thousands of years in China (traditional Chinese medicine) for its specific mood and mental neuro-enhancement properties. 

    Perhaps most notably, as with lion's mane, Ginkgo biloba has effectively treated cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer's disease in studies.

    Mood and mental wellness are other areas of study with this herb. This is because of recent research and findings that ginkgo biloba has "been found to alleviate anxiety symptoms in people with mental decline. Therefore, it was tested for clinical efficacy in younger patients suffering from anxiety."

    Cacao/Cocoa

    Finally, we come to cocoa (a primary ingredient in our Wild Cocotropic Elixir).

    Cocoa, in its purest form, is food, not candy. It is an ancient food that has been used as a brain tonic for thousands of years, particularly in Mesoamerica, where it's been called a "food of the gods."

    Cocoa flavonoids and their other various compounds (including caffeine and theobromine), according to research, "provoke angiogenesis, neurogenesis, and changes in neuron morphology, mainly in regions involved in learning and memory.

    Cocoa has a lot and what it can offer for the brain. From alleviating depression to promoting thinking and energy, it's truly an "all-arounder" as a nootropic.

    Closing Thoughts on Adaptogens and Nootropics 

    Of course, there is plenty of cross-over regarding adaptogens and nootropics. Shilajit (an adaptogen in this article) can rightfully be called a nootropic. Meanwhile, lion's mane (a nootropic in this article) can easily be noted for its adaptogenic properties and the rest of the medicinal mushroom kingdom. 

    Experiment with some of the substances in this article as a call to action. Take them for long periods, and note any results you notice along the way.

    How to Make the Best Reishi Mushroom Tea Recipe

    How to Make the Best Reishi Mushroom Tea Recipe

    We’ve gone over the benefits of reishi before—now it’s time to discover a few excellent ways to drink reishi mushroom tea!

    In a recent article on reishi mushroom, we described how “The increasing popularity of medicinal mushrooms is likely due to an increasing plethora of scientific data pointing to their benefits. To this end, reishi benefits and side effects have earned plenty of attention, for reishi is now coined the ‘mushroom of immortality.’”

    We go on to describe how reishi mushroom is a medicinal mushroom that’s been used in traditional Chinese medicine for around 2000 years. That’s a long time!

    Boasting many useful benefits, some of the primary things going for reishi is its ability to increase natural killer cells, promote mood and energy, and boost overall immunity.

    An investigation into the power of reishi has spurred us on to acquire some really special (and simple) ways to consume reishi mushroom tea.

    Try out the recipe that most appeals to you!

    Reishi Mushroom Tea Recipe Ideas

    Before we begin, it’s worth mentioning the importance of acquiring top-notch reishi mushroom powder for these teas. 

    At Wild Foods, we pride ourselves in producing our Shroom #1 Reishi Mushroom Extract 10:1, Our Wild Reishi is always log-grown by small Chinese farmers that have been growing mushrooms for generations. Many other companies may cultivate their reishi by growing it on sawdust, cork, or grain.

    By only using log-grown we ensure you’re getting Real Food grown in its natural state. Plus the quality of log-grown is quite noticeable over others.

    Alright, onto the recipes!

    Reishi Milk Tea Latte

    Reishi doesn’t necessarily have a bad taste. Actually, many report it tastes something like cocoa powder. Regardless, beginners to the world of mushrooms may wish to start with a tea that emphasizes taste and masks the earthy tones of reishi mushroom. 

    Making reishi mushroom tea with milk is a good choice for a tasty morning or evening beverage. Experiment with ratios and adding in other ingredients to further boost the benefits of your routine drink.

    1. Heat your plant milk of choice in a pot over the stove.
    2. Place the hot milk in a blender. Add a serving (approximately half a tsp) of reishi powder into the blender.
    3. Add a low-glycemic sweetener such as stevia, xylitol, raw honey, or coconut sugar to the blender.
    4. Add any other ingredients to boost the benefits of your tea (think our Wild Cocotropic or a serving of Wild Cocoa Butter for a creamier consistency)
    5. Blend for 7 seconds. Pour into a mug.
    6. Enjoy with a sprinkle of cinnamon on top.

    Simple Reishi Mushroom Tea

    Here’s a simple take on a reishi mushroom tea. It only requires reishi mushroom powder and hot water. 

    1. Boil hot water in a kettle or pot over the stove.
    2. Let the boiling water stand/cool off for 30 seconds.
    3. Place hot water (off the boil) and a serving of reishi in a cup.
    4. Stir thoroughly.

    That’s it. Simplicity. If you want an easier stirring process, feel free to use a blender or our blender bottle. Also note that a bit of lemon pairs nicely with this tea.

    Reishi Mushroom Tea with Golden Milk

    Golden Milk is an Ayurvedic treasure with hosts of benefits. In this recipe, we use our Wild Golden Milk Powder fused with reishi mushroom for a true superfood tea.

    1. Heat plant milk or water over the stove.
    2. Add the water/milk, a serving of golden milk powder, and a serving of reishi mushroom to a blender cup.
    3. Blend for 7 seconds.
    4. Pour and add a sprinkle of cinnamon to the top if desired.